Necronomicookbook: Chainsaw Chili Massacre

August 30th, 2014

Chainsaw Chili Massacre

Okay, so maybe “hungry” is the last thing you feel when watching The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Even so, chili is the official food of Texas and the Sawyer family’s award-winning chili is featured prominently in Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. Creating a Leatherface-inspired chili reciple was a no-brainer, so here it is: my Texas-style Chainsaw Chili Massacre.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 7: Leatherface

August 30th, 2014

Leatherface

Leatherface
Created by Tobe Hooper, Kim Henkel

Leatherface has been played by six actors in the seven Texas Chainsaw Massacre movies. That’s the same number of actors that have played James Bond over the course of twenty-three films. Unlike most horror icons, there isn’t necessarily a lone actor known as “the” Leatherface (although Gunnar Hansen gets credit as the original, and Andrew Bryniarski is the only one to don the skin mask twice). Even so, Leatherface is an undeniable icon, recognized for his mask and, obviously, his chainsaw.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 6: 3D

August 29th, 2014

Texas Chainsaw 3D

Texas Chainsaw 3D (2013)
Directed by John Luessenhop

Horror, like every genre, has gone through a number of fads over the course of film history. There have been several pointless-but-profitable horror remakes in the last decade or so, and many horror fans can’t wait for this trend to taper off a bit. Another gimmick that’s been popular in all genres lately is 3D. Even though the Texas Chainsaw Massacre series was ahead of the curve for the horror remake boom, it was a little late to the party with Texas Chainsaw 3D.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 5: The Beginning

August 28th, 2014

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006)
Directed by Jonathan Liebesman

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre is such a unique film that even its own sequels are drastically different in almost every way possible. When the franchise started over once again with 2003′s Texas Chainsaw Massacre, it was followed by a prequel that closely mimics the style and tone of its predecessor. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning, while technically not a sequel, is the first true continuation of a previous film in the series.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 5: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

August 28th, 2014

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)
Directed by Marcus Nispel

Every sequel in this series has recreated elements of the original film, such as the dinner table scene or the climactic escape. They are all definitely sequels, though, because they are either numbered as such or state that they take place after the events of the first movie. They may not make sense together, but they are all at the very least intended to follow The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. 2003′s Texas Chainsaw Massacre, on the other hand, is the first film to start its own separate chronology separate from that film.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 4: The Next Generation

August 27th, 2014

The Return of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre

The Return of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1994)
Directed by Kim Henkel

Every horror movie franchise is weird. The villains are strange monsters and the stories are convoluted. Rarely does one film in a series have a good story, let alone does the entire franchise fit together well as a whole. In a genre that’s known for being unusual, the Texas Chainsaw movies stand out even more. The most bizarre installment by far is The Next Generation.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 3: Leatherface

August 26th, 2014

Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III

Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III (1990)
Directed by Jeff Burr

In a way, Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III is the most unusual film in the entire series. It’s not ahead of its time like the original, nor does it go in a bizarre new direction like the fourth film. Instead, it’s a nonsensical slasher that fits in perfectly with other franchise horror installments of the late 1980s and early ’90s. With a new director and the third actor to play Leatherface in as many movies, this film features a number of elements common in horror films that are not common within the Texas Chainsaw series.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 2: Part 2

August 25th, 2014

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part 2

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986)
Directed by Tobe Hooper

After the release of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, the horror genre began to rapidly evolve. Michael Myers cemented the slasher subgenre with Halloween and Halloween II. Freddy Krueger was well on his way to icon status after two installments in the Nightmare on Elm Street series. Jason Voorhees had terrorized countless campers, died, been impersonated, and returned from the grave in the first six Friday the 13th movies. In other words, Leatherface almost missed out on the slasher boom he had helped create by the time the long-overdue Texas Chainsaw Massacre sequel was released.

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Texas Chainsaw Week, Day 1: The Texas Chain Saw Massacre

August 24th, 2014

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
Directed by Tobe Hooper

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre is, for a number of reasons, one of the most important horror films of all time. It’s one of the earliest examples of a slasher and helped establish the subgenre. It’s one of the most successful independent movies ever made and established director Tobe Hooper as one of the most promising young filmmakers at the time. Perhaps most impressively, the film has its own unique tone and style that has never been replicated anywhere else, not even by the various sequels and remakes within the Texas Chainsaw Massacre series.

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Movie of the Week: Sharknado 2

August 13th, 2014

Sharknado 2: The Second One

Sharknado 2: The Second One (2014)
Directed by Anthony C. Ferrante

Disney’s Frozen and Iron Man 3 may have made the most money in 2013, but Sharknado easily made the biggest splash. What started out as just another terrible made-for-TV monster movie (which have been countless in recent years) gained appreciation for its absurd premise. It wasn’t just horror fans, either. In fact, some “real” horror fans are offended by the idea of Sharknado representing their beloved genre. Celebrities on social media helped spread the word, and subsequent airings saw increased ratings. The Second One was inevitable.

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